Hawaiian desserts workshop

Mali’uka’ai Cultural Workshop Series last week focused on making Hawaiian desserts.
Kumu Alapaki Luki and other volunteers from Hulili Ke Kukui led the workshop At the end, participants got to keep the paʻiʻai and poi they made. Kumu Alapaki taught the class about how if you take care of (mālama) the land, the land will take care of you. Staff and children from the Keiki Hau’oli Children’s Center stopped by to watch participants pound the kalo as well.

Shoebox gifts help the homeless

The Early Childhood Club and Po’i Na Nalu are sponsoring the Shoebox Project, in which shoeboxes wrapped in holiday wrap and filled with a variety of items are prepared for children specific to a particular gender and age.
These will be distributed to children living in the homeless shelters.
Donations can be dropped off in boxes wrapped in festive paper are located in the computer lab, 2-208, 2-212, library, administration, and Native Hawaiian Center (Building 5, second floor)
And on Wednesday, Dec. 7, students and others will get together at 2 p.m. in Building 2, Room 208 to wrap up the shoeboxes and gifts.

Financial aid workshop Dec. 1

It’s time to begin applying for scholarships and other financial aid for the 2018-19 academic year, and the HonCC Financial Air office is hosting a UH Common Scholarship workshop on Friday, Dec. 1

During the workshop, students will learn about the application process and have time to begin working on their applications. In order to make most of students time in the workshop, participants should bring names and email addresses of three references.

When: Friday, December 1, 2017
Time: 9:00-10:00 am
Location: Bldg 2, Rm 401

Students hosting plastics forum

Students in HonCC’s Occupational and Environmental Safety Management program will
host a forum on the local and global hazards of single-use plastic products, such as bottles and bags, from 1 to 2:30 P.M. Nov. 29, in the student lounge.

The students are enrolled in the fall semester of OESM 160. This is the first time the course has included a class project and public forum on a major issue of pollution and environmental health.

The OESM 160 students and their panel guests will provide information on the hazards of plastics and their harm to people and the environment. They will also examine what other states or cities are doing about this issue.

As part of this class project of trying to identify the severity and lessen the pollution of the environment by single-use plastic products, several of the OESM students, along with their instructor, John Witeck, participated in Saturday morning volunteer work with the Oahu Filipino Community Council picking up plastic and paper litter and trash along Likelike Highway and Kalihi Street. Within an hour more than a dozen large bags of trash were collected.

Refreshments will be served at the forum.

Path to teaching career started with HCC

Ronald Santos graduated from Leilehua High School in Wahiawa 2009 and now, less than 10 years later, he’s a full-time teacher there. But, like many other students who start their career path at Honolulu CC, his journey was anything but a straight shot.
Santos was born in the Philippines and moved to Hawaii when he was 3 years old. After high school, he enrolled at HonCC with the intention of getting certified as an electrician, but found classes for that major difficult to get into.
So he switched course and started pursuing a liberal arts degree, getting more and more active in various extracurricular activities during his time at the school. He became part of the school’s student government, worked for the Student Life and Development office, and wrote stories for the Ka La newspaper.
“I still cherish the relationships I have built from being involved in those organizations because they gave me a sample of things that truly interested me,” Santos said.
Some of his best memories as a student were when he went on trips for the student organizations like the Ho’opili Hou leadership conference and the College Media Association’s annual journalism conference in Orlando, Fla.
“Since, I enjoyed traveling with the campus organizations, I wanted to pursue a career that allowed me to get a job anywhere, so I decided on teaching English,” Santos said.
After getting his associates degree from HonCC in 2012, that dream led him to UH-Hilo, where he got his bachelor’s degree in linguistics and a certification in TESOL (Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages).
After receiving his bachelor’s degree, Santos came back to Oahu and applied to be an educational assistant at Leilehua High School and was quickly hired.
“When they learned about my background in ESL, I was asked if I was interested in teaching some ESL science classes,” he said.
“The most important thing I learned about my career is to try different things,” he said. “You never truly know what career is best for you unless you actually apply and see first-hand what the job is like.”
Santos is well on his way to get a state approved teaching license, yet he hopes to get a chance to teach summer programs abroad some day.
“Teaching is rewarding, but not without its challenges,” he said. Like many teachers, getting students to participate and engage in the classroom without getting out of hand hand are daily tasks for Santos.
He plans on staying at Leillehua High School and hopes to move up the ranks to be an administrator one day.
Gerimi Tangonan wrote this story while a student in Honolulu CC’s Journalimsm 205, News Writing class.